Monday, April 11, 2011

On Immunizations


A community health worker came home the other day to administer polio drops to my kid.

"I got him immunized at the health-care centre on Sunday", I told her.
"Thank you!", she said sincerely.
"What for? He's my child. Why should you thank me?"
"Because so few people do. And even when we go to their house, they ask us to come back later."
"That's ridiculous!"
"You know, the problem is that we give these drops for free. If we charge for it, people will queue up for them."

She'd nailed it. Why can't people value things that are free?
_____
drabble is a story told in exactly 100 words.

Last year, it was I for India, and for Interview

10 comments:

Diandra said...

Because (at least in most people's minds) nothing comes for free. There's always a hidden problem if you don't have to pay for something...

Margot Kinberg said...

Natasha - Perhaps people have this assumption that if it's worth anything, it must cost something. People really do subconsciously associate the value of something with its cost, and although it's untrue, they still do it..

Rosalind Adam said...

That's so true and yet we value a smile and that doesn't cost a thing. Us humans are a strange race.

Stephanie V said...

We certainly do have suspicious natures not to value a gift. But, I've found that to be very true. If we don't charge for a ticket - even if we don't want to - there is no commitment to come. It's about perceptions, I guess.

Marjorie said...

My Father-in-Law's baby sister was permanently damaged by a bad polio vaccine. She was ill and mentally handicapped for the rest of her life. So in some cases a vaccine can do more harm than good. I understand why so many people feel they are great, but for my part I really don't.

LTM said...

I value them! LOL! :D No, it's true that some people might think they're not as important if they're given away. But this isn't one of those things~ :o) <3

Jemi Fraser said...

Wow! That's bizarre. Our health care is free in Canada & it's one of the best parts of being Canadian.

GigglesandGuns said...

Maybe they feel if you don't pay for this sort of thing someone is experimenting on your child.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Natasha .. I remember my parents refused us polio vaccinations as kids .. perhaps because that was more dangerous. When I went to Zimbabwe in the 1970s I had polio drops on sugar lumps to take .. thankfully I didn't contract it.

My mother's cousin had it .. and her sister died from it ..

Love the drabble though - great story telling on a truth.

Thanks - good to visit .. Hilary

slommler said...

Some people really believe that there is no such thing as "free". That we will pay for it in some fashion!
A shame really. Vaccinations are so necessary...especially today!!
Hugs
SueAnn

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